fbpx

     

 

 

An event series marking the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act — Exploring the past, present and future of housing equity in Hennepin County communities

For residents, community leaders and policy makers, housing has become a central and urgent issue in communities throughout Hennepin County. As diverse stakeholders come together to envision solutions that provide safe, dignified housing for all, a new event series — “Racism, Rent and Real Estate: Fair Housing Reframed” — will grapple with our dark history of covenants, redlining and structural racism; and convene cross-sector, community-centered conversations to chart a course for housing equity moving forward.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, landmark legislation authored by a young Minnesota senator named Walter Mondale that sought to remedy housing discrimination through the lens of that era — addressing segregation and promoting integration. Through a multi-event series, Fair Housing Reframed will use the history of and current organizing in Hennepin County communities to explore the history of racial segregation in housing that led to the Fair Housing Act, identify how racialized barriers to housing still manifest today and create the community and political will to make change.  

Convened by: Mapping Prejudice Project, Minnesota Housing Partnership and Mill City Consulting

Co-hosted by: Sabathani Community Center, Preserve Minneapolis, Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization (CANDO), Hennepin History Museum, Hennepin County Library, Jewish Community Action, University of MN- Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, UROC, African Career and Education Resources, Inc., Minneapolis Urban League and others.

Questions or ideas? Please contact Cara Letofsky, Principal at Mill City Consulting at 612-718-3495 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/fairhousingreframed

Sign up for email updates!

 

UPCOMING EVENTS


[Exhibit] Owning Up: Racism and Housing in Minneapolis

Exhibit runs through January 20, 2019

Owning Up: Racism and Housing in Minneapolis explores the history of racial housing discrimination in Minneapolis through the stories of three black families. The exhibit demonstrates the lasting effects of structural discrimination and aims to counter the enduring idea of Minneapolis as a model metropolis. Opening reception will feature remarks from curator Denise Pike and Hennepin History Museum board member Cara Letofsky.

Curated by Denise Pike and Kacie Lucchini Butcher, University of Minnesota’s Heritage Studies and Public History degree program; designed by Augsburg University's graphic design program Design & Agency; and hosted by Hennepin History Museum

 

*** 

PREVIOUS EVENTS

Reframing Fair Housing, Reclaiming Neighborhood History

June 21, 6-8 p.m. at Sabathani Community Center

Hosted by Mapping Prejudice Project, Sabathani Community Center, Mill City Consulting

Recap | Photos | Article

The way our neighborhoods look and feel today are a product of our shared history; one shaped by racist policies that barred households of color from homeownership and wealth accumulation for many years. In spite of these intentional barriers, like redlining and racial covenants, communities of color created and continue to build vibrant neighborhoods, rich with gathering places and family legacies that are often lost to the general public — and policy makers who make decisions that impact our lives everyday. Join us for the first gathering of the “Racism, Rent and Real Estate: Fair Housing Reframed” event series to learn more about the history and impetus of fair housing laws and share your knowledge about the history of your family and neighborhood.


Housing Discrimination Revealed: History of Race & Real Estate in Minneapolis Bus Tour

July 21, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

Hosted by Preserve Minneapolis, Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization, Mapping Prejudice

Recap | Photos | Video 

Many residents of Minneapolis believe that their city has never had any kind of formal segregation. This tour makes visible the structural racism that has undergirded the city’s urban landscape. It also illuminates the community solidarity that developed among African Americans in the face of this white hostility.


[Exhibit] Owning Up: Racism and Housing in Minneapolis

Exhibit runs through Jan 20, 2019

Opening reception recap and photos

Owning Up: Racism and Housing in Minneapolis explores the history of racial housing discrimination in Minneapolis through the stories of three black families. The exhibit demonstrates the lasting effects of structural discrimination and aims to counter the enduring idea of Minneapolis as a model metropolis. Opening reception will feature remarks from curator Denise Pike and Hennepin History Museum board member Cara Letofsky.
 
Curated by Denise Pike and Kacie Lucchini Butcher, University of Minnesota’s Heritage Studies and Public History degree program; designed by Augsburg University's graphic design program Design & Agency; and hosted by Hennepin History Museum


Film Screening: Affordable Housing at Risk

September 22, 2-4 p.m. at Minneapolis Central Library, co-hosted by Twin Cities Housing Speakers Bureau | Recap of the panel discussion

October 5, 5:30-8 p.m. at Ebenezer Community Church, co-hosted by ACER 

The voices of tenants and owners, advocates and elected officials raise the urgency and opportunity to address the loss of affordable housing in the 2016 documentary. Produced by Twin Cities PBS, in partnership with local advocates and funders, “Sold Out: Affordable Housing at Risk” reveals the price we all pay when families are pushed out of our communities as modestly priced units are replaced with upscale developments. Join us for two community conversations about these challenges of upscaling and displacement in communities across Hennepin County.

Photo: Tenant expert panelists at the Sept 22 screening

 

Critical Conversation on Racism, Rent, and Real Estate

October 10, 5:30 to 8 p.m., at Urban Research and Outreach Engagement Center (UROC)

Recap | Video 1 | Video 2

Hosted by Mapping Prejudice Project, UROC, Equity in Place

Join scholars and community members in a University of Minnesota Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC) Critical Conversation on the hidden history of racial covenants in Minneapolis. The discussion will center on new research showing what communities of color have known for decades—that structural barriers and legalized discrimination barred many people of color from buying property and building wealth for most of the last century.

The program will be moderated by Neeraj Mehta, director of learning, McKnight Foundation, with the following panelists: Kirsten Delegard, project director, University of Minnesota Libraries' Mapping Prejudice Project; Owen Duckworth, director of organizing and policy, The Alliance; Mahmoud El-Kati, writer, lecturer, and commentator; Jeremiah Ellison, council member, Minneapolis City Council; and Makeda Zulu-Gillespie, director of community outreach, UROC. It will also include a presentation by Mapping Prejudice Project co-founder and Digital and Geospatial Director Kevin Ehrman-Solberg.

From Redlining to Predatory Lending: The Racial Wealth Gap

October 16, 5:30-8 p.m. at the Minneapolis Urban League (2100 Plymouth Ave)

Video

Hosted by Jewish Community Action, Minneapolis Urban League and partners

Join us for a panel discussion and community conversation about the lifecycle of redlining, disinvestment, predatory lending, and gentrification and displacement — a damaging cycle that runs on racial prejudice and the unregulated flow of extractive capital out of and into communities — and the set of critical interventions from government, communities and businesses that are necessary at each stage of this destructive cycle. This event will lift up the need for community-owned, deeply rooted financial institutions, businesses and housing; for government protections and incentives to make sure that productive, non-extractive services, goods and housing are available to low and moderate income residents during times of disinvestment, and protections for those residents so they are able to remain, thrive and reap the benefits of the influx of capital; and the need for community based advocacy and organizing to hold businesses and investors accountable to make investments that benefit the existing community, rather than profiting from their anticipated and engineered displacement.
 
Reframing Fair Housing: Where do we go from here?

October 25, 6-8 p.m. at Sabathani Community Center

Video

Hosted by Minnesota Housing Partnership, Mill City Consulting

Fifty years since the passage of the federal Fair Housing Act, deep and growing housing inequities remain a persistent and urgent challenge in our communities. Over the course of several months, the “Racism, Rent and Real Estate” event series has explored the history of racial discrimination and segregation in housing in Minneapolis and Hennepin County. In the final event, we will pivot to the future: How do we not only recognize but reverse the legacy of systemic racial discrimination and reframe solutions that both repair harm and meet community-identified needs? Join us for the closing event as we consider how to “reframe” the housing issues — and solutions — we face today.

Imagery / branding by Mariana Pelaez, University Libraries Graphic Designer

 

 


       
Sponsored by